Developer hacks Watch OS to get a web browser running on Apple Watch.

Screen Shot 2015-05-10 at 16.20.51

Prominent community developer and jailbreaker Comex has posted a video showing a successful hack of Watch OS to get the device running a web browser.

In the video, Comex has managed to get the Google homepage to render on the small Watch display. Apple does not include a Safari browser app on the Watch, for obvious reasons. The video shows that scrolling around even basic web pages on a tiny display is impractical.

More importantly, the video shows that it is possible to get the Watch to run arbitrary code. This could be the first step towards a ‘jailbreak’ of the Apple Watch although Comex makes no such promises to ever release the details of his hack.

The video shows familiar iOS UI, like the Copy/Define contextual menu, which is an amusing look at the underlying software stack that powers the Watch. Watch OS 1.0 is actually a version of iOS 8.2 that runs a custom front-end layer to display the device-specific UI, called Carousel (Springboard is the iPad/iPhone equivalent).

CEnjtgJVIAADMNW

To further prove the point, Comex also shows the Watch presenting the iOS dictionary view — again scrunched down onto the ~1.5 inch screen. Apple has announced a native SDK is in the works, which will allow the wider developer community to create apps that run code on the OS itself (rather than through an iPhone app extension a la WatchKit). Until then, community hacks like this are the first glimpse of what might be possible.

Apple said native third-party Watch apps are coming “later this year”. Many have took this to mean an announcement at WWDC, which runs from June 8th to June 12th.

Advertisements

How To Give Your iPhone A Working Smart Cover, Just Like The iPad.

How To Give Your iPhone A Working Smart Cover, Just Like The iPadThe iPhone finally gets a working Smart Cover.

We’re huge fans of the new SurfacePad case from TwelveSouth. It’s just like a Smart Cover, with just one drawback: it doesn’t turn your iPhone on and off automatically when you open it or close it.

We hated that, so we figured out a way to turn the SurfacePad, or any other wallet-style iPhone case, into a working Smart Cover just like the iPad has. The hack doesn’t take much work, and you’ll save yourself from having to unlock your iPhone every time you just want to check something really quick.

Here’s how to do it:

Before you start you’ll need a jailbroken iPhone. If you haven’t jailbroken your iPhone yet, then follow our guide on how to jailbreak your iPhone the right way. Once your iPhone is jailbroken then you’re ready begin.

1). Download the ‘Always On Proximity’ tweak from the Big Boss Repo in Cydia. 

2). Install Always On Proximity.

3). Respring your iPhone.

4). You’re good to go.

alwaysonproximity

The Always On Proximity tweak turns your iPhone on or off based on whether there is an object close to your iPhone’s proximity sensor. If you cover the top portion of your iPhone with an object like your finger, the screen will shut off. Remove the object, and the screen will turn back on but you don’t have to swipe to unlock your iPhone.

Now your SurfacePad or any other iPhone folio case can function like the iPad’s Smart Cover. Shoot, you can even just put your iPhone in your jeans and it will automatically turn off when in your pocket, and then back on when you pull it out.

Source: Cult of Mac.

3D Printed Adapter Puts iPhone 5 Into Apple’s Universal Dock.

Got a “Universal” iPhone dock? Yeah, me too, and it’s pretty useless now most of my iDevices are Lightning powered. But Shapeways user nginear can help. He’s come up with an iPhone 5 adapter which will plug straight into your dock, letting you keep on using it for at least another year or so,.

The 3D-printed adapter clips into the Universal Dock and provides space for the Lightning-to-30-pin adapter you should already own. There’s a back plate to support the iPhone, and a scalloped cut-out to make pressing the home button easier.

The rub is that it costs $40. Or $40.01, to be precise. That’s in addition to the $29 you’ll pay fopr the 30-pin adapter. At least you don’t have to buy the dock – if you don’t already have one, you should probably look for a proper Lightning dock.

Then again, this setup does allow you to use the Apple IR remote with the iPhone (or iPad mini) and hook it up to a stereo. That’s pretty neat.

Source: Cult of Mac.